SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story

starstarstarstarstar (1)
Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Send us your Comments

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

Against the odds, Princeton Baptist cardiologist saves patient's life First-of-its-kind 20 hour procedure conducted on massive aneurysm

Philips and Validic aim to combine fitness data with the EHR Adding medical value to consumer wearables

Optical Coherence Tomography scanner a boon to basal-cell diagnosis VivoSight OCT may lead to a future with fewer biopsies

With Avicenna, IBM Watson Health interprets radiology images Commercialization preparations are just beginning

Are low dose radiation concerns based on bad science? Loyola research team thinks so Examining the harmful side of dose preoccupation

Toshiba to sell non-imaging health care business in addition to Medical Systems division Stock in the company has hit 35-year low

MR illuminates link between multiple sclerosis, inferior ability to taste MS brain lesions inversely correlate with taste capability: report

Pacemaker and ICD battery life needs to be extended to last 25 years Replacing batteries can lead to life-threatening infections

New telehealth legislation getting support from all angles CONNECT for Health Act gaining bipartisan, industry traction

Calling for a more personalized approach to preventing breast and ovarian cancers Psychological and medical risks need to be considered

Blood test may beat
imaging in cancer prediction

Blood test could detect lung cancer up to five years before CT scans

by Brendon Nafziger , DOTmed News Associate Editor
A blood test could detect about half of lung cancers up to five years before other tests, according to a team of British scientists.

In a series of papers to be presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, the scientists from the company Oncimmune tout their "Early CDT-Lung Test" for finding around 40 percent of lung cancers years before they show up on CT scans.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Zetta Offers Used CT & MRI, Multislice PET/CT Systems, Service & Parts

Zetta is a high performance independent service organization offering preowned / used medical equipment, dedicated CT & MRI service and quality replacement parts to the medical imaging industry. Phone: 847-550-9990 Email: Sales@zettamed.com



The company hopes the test, commercially available in the United States starting Tuesday, will not only save lives by detecting cancer early, but drive down health care costs.

The test works by looking for antibodies, called auto-antibodies, which the body produces to combat cancer.

As Geoffrey Hamilton-Fairley, executive chairman of Oncimmune, explained to DOTmed News, cancer cells divide rapidly. During division, they release antigens that the body recognizes as foreign, which it combats with auto-antibodies.

"Everybody has a background count of these auto-antibodies," Hamilton-Fairley said, which actually increase as we age, possibly because our bodies are fighting off many less aggressive cancers successfully.

The research originated with John Robertson, a professor at the University of Nottingham. As part of their yearly check-up, his patients at high-risk for breast cancer had their blood drawn. If they came down with cancer, Robertson went back to their blood samples and retroactively tested them for the auto-antibodies, finding that over half of the cancers could have been found four years before diagnosis.

For the current test, patients have their blood samples mailed to Oncimmune's U.S. testing facility in De Soto, Kan., just outside Kansas City.

The researchers then choose a selection of around six antigens that they pass a patient's blood sample over. If auto-antibodies are present, they'll bind to the antigens. After doing this a few times for accuracy, researchers develop the patient's antigen "fingerprint." This fingerprint is then compared against a population cut-off to judge the patient's risk for developing cancer.

Eventually, physicians will compare a patient's fingerprint against those taken from previous years, and not just population cut-offs, for more accurate readings, Hamilton-Fairley said.

"We'll end up with your own individual antigen fingerprint," he said, "and you'll be able to compare that year by year, and over time you'll pay more attention if you stray from the personal profile."

For now, they recommend one test about every five years, but as the patient ages or if there are risk factors - specifically, smoking - doctors might look at it more often.

Continue reading Blood test could detect lung cancer up to five years before CT scans ...
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.
Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2016 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED