SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story

starstarstarstarempty star (1)
Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Send us your Comments

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

Optical Coherence Tomography scanner a boon to basal-cell diagnosis VivoSight OCT may lead to a future with fewer biopsies

Philips and Validic aim to combine fitness data with the EHR Adding medical value to consumer wearables

With Avicenna, IBM Watson Health interprets radiology images Commercialization preparations are just beginning

Are low dose radiation concerns based on bad science? Loyola research team thinks so Examining the harmful side of dose preoccupation

Toshiba to sell non-imaging health care business in addition to Medical Systems division Stock in the company has hit 35-year low

MR illuminates link between multiple sclerosis, inferior ability to taste MS brain lesions inversely correlate with taste capability: report

Pacemaker and ICD battery life needs to be extended to last 25 years Replacing batteries can lead to life-threatening infections

New telehealth legislation getting support from all angles CONNECT for Health Act gaining bipartisan, industry traction

Calling for a more personalized approach to preventing breast and ovarian cancers Psychological and medical risks need to be considered

Exposing the secrets of voodoo dolls through X-ray Virtual autopsy yields forensic insights in Haitian voodoo crimes

CyberKnife "valid option" for low-risk prostate cancer: study

by Brendon Nafziger , DOTmed News Associate Editor
A follow-up study using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation for low-risk prostate cancer found most patients had disease-free survival after five years, with little toxicity, results that researchers say could help bolster support for the treatment.

"In our mind, it's no longer investigational or experimental therapy," study co-author Dr. Debra E. Freeman, a radiation oncologist with CyberKnife Centers of Tampa Bay in Florida, told DOTmed News. "It's a valid option in the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer."

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Innovating Health & Wellness Within Your World

Industry Leading Warranty and Service. Clinical safety and Ergonomics. Patient Safety and Comfort. Schedule a meeting with one of our sales professionals at 717-235-6807 to establish Oakworks as your table contract supplier.



CyberKnife is a robotic radiosurgery device made by Accuray Inc. of Sunnyvale, Calif., which can deliver "hypofractionated" treatments -- that is, high doses of radiation precisely sculpted to the tumor or target, and delivered in a smaller number of sessions. It was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat tumors anywhere in the body around nine years ago.

For the study, the patients received between 35 and 36.25 Gy in five fractions.

Freeman said slower growing, "indolent" prostate cancers are thought to respond better to hypofractionated treatment, as opposed to radiotherapy treatments where smaller doses are spread out over a longer time. "They are not exquisitely sensitive to low doses of radiation, and are more sensitive and respond more to higher doses of radiation," she said.

More aggressive, faster spreading cancers tend to be treated with lower, more frequent doses, she said.

In the study, published online this week in Radiation Oncology, researchers examined results from a pooled group of 41 patients from Stanford, Calif. and Naples, Fla., who received treatment between 2003 and 2005. The main endpoint was biochemical disease-free survival after five years, a standard measure that looks at whether prostate-specific antigen levels remain low and stable following treatment, suggesting disease is absent.

For the patients, at a median five years after therapy the biochemical disease-free survival was around 93 percent, results comparable with surgery and other forms of radiation therapy, Freeman said.

Toxic side effects from zapping the prostate were also rare, with no rectal bleeding or ulcerations, and no significant damage to the bladder, Freeman said.

"With any kind of radiation, there's a risk of some damage," she said. "You can't really get to the prostate with radiation without brushing by the bladder and the rectum on the way there. They can be injured in surgery, as well."

However, one patient did have a urologic problem, but Freeman said it was unclear if it was caused by the radiation treatment or an earlier procedure used to dilate the urethra because of difficulties passing urine.

Continue reading CyberKnife "valid option" for low-risk prostate cancer: study...
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.
Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2016 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED