SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

With Avicenna, IBM Watson Health interprets radiology images Commercialization preparations are just beginning

Are low dose radiation concerns based on bad science? Loyola research team thinks so Examining the harmful side of dose preoccupation

Toshiba to sell non-imaging health care business in addition to Medical Systems division Stock in the company has hit 35-year low

MR illuminates link between multiple sclerosis, inferior ability to taste MS brain lesions inversely correlate with taste capability: report

Pacemaker and ICD battery life needs to be extended to last 25 years Replacing batteries can lead to life-threatening infections

New telehealth legislation getting support from all angles CONNECT for Health Act gaining bipartisan, industry traction

Calling for a more personalized approach to preventing breast and ovarian cancers Psychological and medical risks need to be considered

Exposing the secrets of voodoo dolls through X-ray Virtual autopsy yields forensic insights in Haitian voodoo crimes

Portable seizure device yields unexpected mood benefits to PTSD patients Reduced sleeplessness, depression and nightmares by 30 percent

MR-compatible cardiac device implants add significant value to patient care A first-of-its-kind study finds value providers may be drawn to

CMS proposes paying non-docs who order portable X-rays, too

by Brendon Nafziger , DOTmed News Associate Editor
Although the proposed 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule includes cuts to imaging and radiation therapy services, it does expand one aspect of imaging: some non-physician providers might now get paid for ordering portable X-rays.

Medicare regulations established in the late 1960s require the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to only reimburse portable X-rays -- X-rays taken in someone's home, hospice or group living situation using a mobile system -- ordered by a medical doctor or a doctor of osteopathy.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

CONNECT AS IF LIFE DEPENDS ON IT! Because in many ways it does

And we can help. Conserus™ offers a flexible, vendor-neutral suite of imaging solutions that help orchestrate interoperability between existing systems and among specialists while helping to simplify the transition from volume to value-based care.



Now, under new proposals released Friday, a range of physician and non-physician providers, from nurse practitioners and midwives to social workers, can also get paid for ordering the scans, as long as they're in compliance with state law and their Medicare statutory benefit.

"Non-physician practitioners have become an increasingly important component of clinical care, and we believe that delivery systems should take full advantage of all members of a health care team, including non-physician practitioners," CMS said in the proposed rules.

CMS said the change was initiated in part from provider feedback.

In December, the Office of the Inspector General found CMS was paying millions of dollars a year in reimbursements for portable X-rays ordered by non-physician practitioners, prompting the agency to issue a special report reminding providers that the services could only be ordered by an MD or a DO.

As a result, stakeholders told CMS that providers found the rule confusing, as Medicare generally reimburses non-physician practitioners for ordering other diagnostic tests, including lab tests and non-portable X-rays.

Covered by the proposed new rules are nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, physician assistants, certified nurse-midwives, clinical psychologists and clinical social workers. Also included are doctors previously uncovered by the regulations, including doctors of optometry, dental surgery, dental medicine and podiatric medicine, CMS said.

However, CMS did say they were "concerned" by much of the questionable billing practices by portable X-ray suppliers turned up by OIG's December investigation, such as billing for multiple trips to the same facility on the same day, and billing for portable scans on a patient who also had a scan at a doctor's office or hospital on the same day.

"In conjunction with our proposal to expand the scope of physicians and non-physician practitioners who can order portable X-ray services, we intend to develop, as needed, monitoring standards predicated by these and other OIG findings," CMS said.

The comment period on the new rules runs until early September.

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2016 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED