SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

USPSTF new breast screening recommendations 'would result in thousands of breast cancer deaths': ACR Task Force gives screening women ages 40 to 49 a "C" — which insurers need not pay for

Democrats renew effort to repeal the medical device tax Democrats in the House of Representatives are following their Senate colleagues in the latest legislative effort to repeal the medical device tax.

Users of mobile health apps in UK expect higher quality of life — doctors not so sure U.K. study compares health app expectations from medical professionals and users

Fewer patients are undergoing prostate radiotherapy, despite its benefits: study Researchers says clinicians need to make referrals to radiation oncologists when appropriate

Top 10 apps for the serious health care professional Check out the best apps for the health care professional

Cardinal Health agrees to pay $26.8 million settlement over monopoly charges The proposed federal court order aims to restore competition in six markets

CMS star rating system finds physician-owned hospitals most satisfactory Of the participating physician-owned hospitals, 67 percent received four stars or more

Twitter may help predict ED visits for chronic conditions Asthma incurs over $50 million in annual medical costs

So long, 'doc fix': Obama signs SGR repeal into law After almost 20 years, 'doc fix' legislation finally put out of its misery

BIOTRONIK gets FDA nod for a first of its kind implantable cardioverter defibrillator Inventra DX is capable of ultra-high energy, 42 joules, initial shock

What do some head CT scans and early C-sections have in common?

by Brendon Nafziger , DOTmed News Associate Editor
Quick, what do these have in common: a PET-CT scan to screen for cancer in a healthy adult; a CT scan for a child with a minor head injury but no clinical problems; and a cesarean section on a woman with a normal pregnancy before the 39th week?

They're all potentially unnecessary tests or procedures included on a new round of lists for the Choosing Wisely campaign, which aims to advise doctors and patients about potentially harmful or wasteful medicine. The lists, prepared by 17 leading medical societies, will be announced Thursday at a press conference in Washington, D.C.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Joint Commission changes are taking place July 1, 2015. Are YOU ready?

As the leading Joint Commission accreditation service provider in the U.S., WEST PHYSICS knows these new requirements in depth. Click here to find out how WEST PHYSICS can help guide you successfully through the process.



The 90 procedures form the second phase of the campaign, and stack onto the 45 other questionable therapies and exams released when Choosing Wisely kicked off last April.

"We were trying to spark conversations about what care is really needed and we think we've exceeded our goal," Daniel Wolfson, COO of the ABIM Foundation, which started the campaign, told DOTmed News.

Previous estimates have suggested up to one-third of medical care in the United States, or some $200 billion worth, is wasteful or unnecessary, Wolfson said.

The group will also announce Thursday a $2.5 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Wolfson said they will use the money to fund efforts by regional groups or medical societies to raise awareness about unnecessary care.

He said they expect to finance 20 projects, possibly including pilot studies on how to use decision support systems, computer programs that use appropriateness criteria to guide doctors when ordering tests or therapies.

Grant recipients will likely be announced in late March or early April, he said.

How the lists are made

The societies participating in the second round, which include the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, typically made their lists of about five procedures by consulting their quality and safety committees or board members, Wolfson said.

The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging said it compiled a list of eight or nine suggestions after meeting with different subcommittees, a list it then whittled down to the final five.

The procedures included on the lists aren't necessarily performed that often. Dr. Gary Dillehay, SNMMI's president-elect and the chair of the groups' Choosing Wisely task force, said the tests they recommended caution about weren't known to be particularly abused or overused. "Times have changed on some of these things, and they (just) don't apply anymore," he told DOTmed News.

Continue reading What do some head CT scans and early C-sections have in common?...
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2015 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED