Current Location:
> This Story

Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts


More Industry Headlines

Focused ultrasound used to treat depression for first time Non-radiation treatment eliminates the risks of open neurosurgery

Ex-dentist no longer smiling as court shuts down his home-use medical laser businesses Claimed QLaser useful against cancer, cardiac arrest, HIV/AIDS, etc.

Could this super tiny linac revolutionize radiation therapy? 100x smaller than industry standard and 10x greater accelerating gradient

Hospital in India among first to purchase Varian’s VitalBeam Radiotherapy for facilities with a relatively modest budget

FDA orders duodenoscope makers to conduct safety studies Manufacturers responsible for monitoring end user cleaning compliance

Colorectal cancer screening too aggressive for certain people: researchers Risk among patients with family history gets progressively smaller with age

Trice and FUJIFILM SonoSite develop imaging-sharing portable ultrasound Embedded communication is the way of the future

Kentucky Trailer rolls on with acquisition of Smit Mobile Equipment Will expand mobile medical footprint internationally

Half of all late-stage lung cancer patients are over-treated with radiation New study raises concerns regarding financial motivation

Medical Museum: Medical Chest Learn more about a vintage medical chest from an early 19th century pharmacist

(Courtesy FDA)

Radiopharmaceutical cleared for breast and skin cancer

by Loren Bonner , DOTmed News Online Editor
On Wednesday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new radioactive diagnostic imaging agent used to help doctors with the staging and management of breast and melanoma cancer patients.

According to Frederic H. Fahey, DSc, president of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI), the new drug, technetium Tc 99m tilmanocept (Lymphoseek), will give doctors a more accurate way to find the sentinel lymph node, which in turn will help them determine where the patient's cancer has spread.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Solve the service puzzle with Consensys

We believe the right person to decide how best to service your diagnostic imaging equipment is you. Our reputation is built on providing high quality & reliable service to our customers. MRI | CT | Ultrasound | Mammography

During the standard sentinel node biopsy procedure for breast and melanoma cancer patients, which determines if the cancer has spread beyond the primary tumor and into the lymphatic system, doctors use a handheld radioactive detector to find which lymph nodes have been taken up by the agent's radioactivity. They remove them and look for cancer.

"Tc 99m tilmanocept lets you be more confident that you are taking the correct lymph node out," Fahey told DOTmed News.

Previous lymph node mapping agents — including sulfur colloid and isosulfan blue — were based on the size of the particle and would occasionally miss the correct sentinel lymph nodes. Sulfur colloid was approved by the FDA in 1974 and isosulfan blue in 1981.

Over 30 years later, the arrival of a new lymph node mapping agent — Lymphoseek — is a testament to the advancements in molecular imaging that have taken place over the past 10 to 15 years.

"It's a receptor-based agent that targets receptors on the surface of the lymphatic cells," said Fahey. "It has more of targeted approach to how it decides what the sentinel lymph node is."

In other words, whether the agent goes to the correct lymph node is no longer based on the size of the particle; instead it depends on the agent actually seeking out the lymphatic cells and sticking to them, according to Fahey.

For patients, this means the agent can be injected in a more convenient manner because it stays in place for a longer period of time.

"You can inject the agent on the day of the surgery or inject it the day before surgery," said Fahey.

According to a statement from the FDA, data from the clinical trials that established approval of the drug showed a notable number of nodes were localized only by Lymphoseek, compared with blue dye, another drug used to help locate lymph nodes.

The trials consisted of 332 patients in two trials with melanoma or breast cancer. All patients were injected with Lymphoseek and blue dye.

Lymphoseek is marketed by the Dublin, Ohio-based Navidea Biopharmaceuticals Inc., but will be distributed in the U.S. by Cardinal Health Inc., according to a statement from Navidea Biopharmaceuticals.

Back to DOTmed News
  Pages: 1


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2015, Inc.