SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

GE and GlaxoSmithKline team up for oncology testing Working to standardize diagnostic testing

Boosting access to primary care Increasing amount of physicians is not the answer

Federal government weighs in on antibiotic resistance Issues national strategy and calls for alternative treatments

A protein can speed up recovery after radiation and chemo Shows promise in animal experiments

Patient engagement solutions market expected to soar Will hit $13.7 billion by 2019

The pioneer of public health nursing This month in medical history, September 1, 1940

Big data platform designed for new value-based model Helps physicians improve outcomes while reducing costs

Hospitals saving billions on charity care ACA may save expansion state hospitals up to $4.2 billion in 2014

FDA approves GE's new PET/CT Higher sensitivity and field-of-view

Consensys joins forces with Oncology Services International A strategic alliance among ISOs

Hospital-acquired infections cost nearly $10 billion per year

by Nancy Ryerson , Staff Writer
The top five hospital-acquired infections cost health care $9.8 billion a year, according to a new report published in JAMA.

"It's lower than past estimates, but they're all avoidable outcomes that we could probably decrease down to zero," study author Dr. Eyal Zimlichman told DOTmed News.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

We want to buy your Siemens Symphony or Avanto MRI -- today!

Top Dollar Paid, Fixed or Mobile. Call our Siemens Specialist for a Quote today -- 212-558-6600 Ext. 250 DOTmed Certified



Surgical site infections contributed the most to coverall costs, making up 33.7 percent of the total. Central-line associated bloodstream infections are the most costly HAIs, at $45,814, followed by ventilator-associated pneumonia at $40,144, Clostridium difficile infection at $11,285 and catheter-associated urinary tract infections at $896.

Altogether, HAIs affect between five and 10 percent of hospitalized patients each year, according to the CDC.

The study aimed to encourage facilities to invest more heavily in infection control tactics.

Zimlichman said that while the study suggests that infection rates have gone down, as the cost was lower than expected, hospitals tend to do a better job with some infections than with others, such as surgical site infections.

"We're not doing a good surveillance with surgical site infections," said Zimlichman. "Those are evident after the patient has been discharged from the hospital and goes to his primary care physician, so the hospital will not even know about the infection. If there's more federal funding for reporting, the hospital can use that data."

Zimlichman said initiatives such as the CMS non-payment policy for certain complications have helped reduce infection rates at hospitals around the country, but that more policy updates are needed.

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2014 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED