SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Magazine Features

Focused Ultrasound New Technology for the new paradigm

Imaging Department Priorities Lorna Young, Senior Director, Market Research, IMV Medical Information Division, shares highlights from a major research paper

Countdown to MEDICA 2014 Medica - the world's largest medical industry trade show -- to host over 4,600 exhibitors

Despite obstacles, 3-D mammo is making huge strides With reimbursement around the corner, the sector may explode

Imaging children Playing up kid-friendly imaging will improve your bottom line

See All Magazine Features  

More Industry Headlines

Rising number of U.S. pediatrics receiving proton therapy Treatment yields unique benefits for young cancer patients

Mevion partners with Philips to improve proton therapy treatment New technology only takes a few seconds to scan tumor

Kentucky Trailer acquires Advanced Mobility to expand medical footprint Together they look toward a greater international presence

Screening with tomo and mammo leads to 405 fewer false positives per 1,000 women The cost of the two is relative to cost of mammo alone

Comparing catheters for early stage breast brachytherapy Is the treatment underutilized? The BC5 Project thinks so.

Health Gorilla Marketplace expands in effort to demystify ACO and IPA options Version 2.0 adds seven new vendor categories to its market reach

Siemens' new MR kit may reduce pediatric anxiety and need for sedation Could lead to reduced costs and increased efficiency

400 experts gather at Focused Ultrasound Foundation's annual meeting 200 scientific presentations show promising new research

380 hospitals execs weigh in on the future The quest to provide better care with fewer resources

Companies develop pediatric medical devices to compete for $50,000 prize Will the smallest of patients finally have more options?

Special report: Imaging informatics

by Lisa Chamoff , DOTmed contributing reporter
This first appeared in the May 2014 issue of DOTmed HealthCare Business News

When the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 kicked off a program to provide incentive payments to doctors who demonstrate meaningful use of certified electronic health record technology, many radiologists were left scratching their heads, wondering whether or not the program applied to them.

Five years later, the federal government has distributed millions of dollars in incentives to radiologists, but doctors are still hoping the program will evolve to be truly “meaningful” for imaging.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

How to Get the Most Out of Your Service Providers

(and Add Value to Your Facility). Knowing where and how to add value greatly benefits your facility-- and your personal career. Read more and get a comparison tool to help you make smart decisions



Since many of the core requirements of Meaningful Use — collecting patient demographic information and smoking status, for example — are geared more toward primary care doctors who actually visit with patients, it has been a challenge for practices to comply. As of last year, only about 10 to 12 percent of the country’s 30,000 radiologists had successfully attested to stage 1.

“Meaningful Use is talking about office visits, patient encounters,” says Dr. David Hirschorn, director of Radiology Informatics at Staten Island University Hospital and also a research fellow in Radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School. “It’s a shame that the program does not really address health IT in radiology.”

Radiologists are taking advantage, albeit in small numbers. Imaging centers that have invested in the certified technology to reap the benefits — a maximum of $44,000 over five years for physicians who collect at least $24,000 a year in Medicare payments — and avoid penalties, have managed to make it work.

Overcoming challenges
Dr. Wells Mangrum leads Meaningful Use efforts for Medical X-Ray Consultants, an 11-radiologist group based in Eau Claire, Wis. His group works with many hospitals, none of which have an EMR system that is certified for outpatient Meaningful Use.

To comply with the law, Medical X-Ray Consultants has had to adopt its own EMR. They selected Imaging Elements, a radiologycentric EHR provider that offers a complete certified solution to meet outpatient Meaningful Use requirements. Robert Cooke, who most recently was a senior vice president at Fujifilm Medical Systems, founded the company in 2012.

To overcome the challenge of recording data from patient encounters, Medical X-Ray Consultants worked with its billing company, Cvikota, to electronically collect the necessary information from the many hospitals the practice works with. This greatly simplified the process, Mangrum says.

Medical X-Ray Consultants is still in stage 1 of Meaningful Use compliance. Mangrum says that compliance has been financially rewarding in the short-term. Their group has been able to keep 75 percent of the government payment with only 25 percent of costs used to finance infrastructure, such as the EMR.

Continue reading Special report: Imaging informatics...
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 - 4 >>

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2014 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED