SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story

starstarstarstarstar (1)
Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

Never Miss a Story

Sign Up For Weekly Top Stories

 

More Industry Headlines

SBRT studies show positive results for lung cancer in elderly and prostate cancer New research unveiled at ASTRO

New radiation therapy techniques boost early stage lung cancer survival rates: ASTRO

The ASTRO new product showcase A few products and companies that will be featured at this year's premiere oncology meeting

Stereotactic radiosurgery vs. whole brain radiation therapy: study compares outcomes at ASTRO

Study finds 1.5-T MR exams are safe for patients with implanted cardiac devices Findings may help patients with implants gain coverage for scans

PET agent, flurpiridaz F 18, shows promise over SPECT for cardiac imaging May become diagnostic imaging of choice for CAD

Avera Health discusses growing success of telehealth Coming to grips with a new tool and its place in the care spectrum

UPS experiments with drone delivery of medical supplies New FAA rules will make it easier to commercialize drone usage

GE and Trice Imaging partner for cloud-based ultrasound Tricefy is now available with GE's Voluson E series and ViewPoint 6 software

Researchers crunch numbers on ACO's impact on radiology Payment models impact cost, quality, utilization, and technological investment

Dr. Minoshima,
co-author of the appropriate use criteria.

Alzheimer's disease PET scan guidelines released for first time

by Nancy Ryerson , Staff Writer
Before new PET technology came on the scene, physicians could only examine the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients once they died. Now, new PET images can show the brain plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease in living patients, technology that, while ground-breaking, is expensive and may not produce useful results for every patient. On Jan. 28, the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and the Alzheimer's Association co-released guidelines that give physicians, patients and family members the tools to determine whether the cutting-edge tests are right for a patient.

"Even though it's really exciting new technology, which we are certain will contribute to patient care, because of the expense as well as it's not [being a] perfect test, we want to really carefully integrate this technology for the best care of the patient," said Dr. Satoshi Minoshima, SNMMI member and co-author of the appropriate use criteria. "That's really the reason for creating this appropriate use criteria."

Story Continues Below Advertisement

CT, MRI, NM, SPECT/CT, PET & PET/CT service, refurbished systems and parts

Accelerate your ROI with our Black Diamond Certified refurbished systems. One year warranty - ISO 13485 Certified - FDA registered - Over 65k parts in inventory DOTmed Certified



Dr. Minoshima explained that the test, still in its early stages, has about a 90 to 95 percent accuracy rate. And results can be misleading if used on the wrong patients. Elevated beta-amyloid plaques are one of the defining signs of Alzheimer's disease, but for reasons unknown, the plaques can sometimes appear on seemingly healthy brains as well.

Also, many cases of Alzheimer's can be diagnosed without the use of scans. The guidelines suggest using them for cases when a person younger than 65 is showing symptoms, or if the case is more difficult to diagnose, such as if the patient had a stroke recently and is already showing some cognitive decline.

"In clinical diagnosis, it's very difficult to distinguish Alzheimer's disease if the patient had a stroke," said Dr. Minoshima. "Having PET imaging, that shows really positive amyloid deposition, really helps atypical cases like that."

The guidelines also note that the tests are inappropriate when used to determine the severity of dementia, when requested, based solely on family history of dementia or Alzheimer's disease and for non-medical reasons, such as insurance.

The SNMMI team combed through medical journals and sought comments from nuclear medicine professionals in order to develop the guidelines. Dr. Minoshima hopes the guidelines will help physicians get the most out of the emerging technology.

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2016 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED