DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

Business Affairs Homepage

Medmo lets patients set price for radiology imaging tests A travel industry concept comes to healthcare

Bruker in deal to acquire JPK Instruments JPK makes microscopy instruments for biomolecular and cellular imaging

First radiology center opens in Zimbabwe capital to help curb shortage Currently 115 radiologists in country of 14 million people

Onkos Surgical and Insight Medical partner to bring augmented reality to tumor surgery Could this become the new standard of care?

Veritas closes $1 billion GE Healthcare software unit buy Will run newly acquired business as a stand-alone company

Praxair in deal to sell European assets to Taiyo Nippon Sanso Move is dependent on the successful closing of the Praxair-Linde merger

Precision X-Ray and Faxitron Bioptics combine business assets Forming a new global leader in biological irradiation

DaVita hit with $383.5 million jury verdict in dialysis death suit Three patients suffered cardiac arrest after getting GranuFlo therapy

Ultrasound Versus IR: Making decisions about real-time location systems Doing your homework is key to making the right investment in RTLS

Alliance completes deal for Piramal Imaging Expanding market presence in molecular imaging

Plans to grow its additive business
to $1B by 2020

GE opens its first European 3-D printing and design center in Sweden

by Lauren Dubinsky , Senior Reporter
GE Healthcare recently opened its first European 3-D printing and design center in Uppsala, Sweden.

"Additive manufacturing has been hailed the fourth industrial revolution, because of its potential to improve product design and manufacturing efficiency," Andreas Marcstrom, manager of additive engineering at the new Innovative Design and Advanced Manufacturing Technology Center, told HCB News.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Servicing GE Nuclear Medicine equipment with OEM trained engineers

We offer full service contracts, PM contracts, rapid response, time and material,camera relocation. Nuclear medicine equipment service provider since 1975. Click or call now for more information 800 96 NUMED



The center will use metal and polymer 3-D printers and robotic technology to speed up the development of new products. Its research and design teams will work with advanced manufacturing engineers and customers to design, test and produce 3-D-printed parts for GE products.

GE decided to build the center in Uppsala because the area offers the infrastructure and expertise it needs to succeed.

"The center is at the heart of the biggest research and development organization within GE Healthcare Life Sciences — 400 people," said Marcstrom. "At the same facilities, you have teams with post-processing expertise as well as global supply chain and manufacturing."

Close by in UmeƄ, Northern Sweden, there is also a hardware manufacturing facility for GE's Life Sciences' BioProcess business. The teams from all of these areas of expertise will collaborate on projects at the new center.

According Marcstrom, the use of 3-D printers has the potential to cuts costs and improve the company's supply chain and products. For instance, a 3-D-printed part can combine 20 parts into a single part and improve performance.

That's especially beneficial for the biomanufacturing industry since the manufacturing equipment is made up of hundreds of different parts. GE is currently working with Amgen to evaluate the performance of a 3-D-printed, custom-designed chromatography column. This tool is used to develop biopharmaceuticals for cancer and immune disease.

It's being tested to determine if it can be used in Amgen's research to help develop better processes for the purification stage of biopharmaceutical production.

The team at the center is also developing and programming multiple robots called cobots. They have already been installed in GE's factories around the world to improve the efficiency of production lines.

GE has another advanced manufacturing engineering center based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The teams at both centers will share knowledge and collaborate on new design ideas.

Globally, the 3-D printed medical devices market is booming. A MarketsandMarkets report from August predicted that it will grow from $840 million in 2017 to almost $1.9 billion by 2022.

GE has big plans for this market. The company is seeking to grow its new additive business to $1 billion by 2020. It plans to sell 10,000 additive machines over the next 10 years.

Business Affairs Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED