New practice corrects pump function in heart failure

New practice corrects pump function in heart failure

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style | March 18, 2019 Cardiology
Lisbon, Portugal – 18 March 2019: Late-breaking results from the ElectroCRT trial presented today at EHRA 20191 a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress, pave the way for a new standard of care to improve the heart’s pump function in selected patients with heart failure.

Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT), or biventricular pacing, is used to treat heart failure patients with left bundle branch block. Electrical impulses that travel from the atria to the ventricles are delayed or blocked, causing a prolonged and abnormal heartbeat. For CRT, a pacemaker is implanted below the collarbone and three leads are attached in the heart to resynchronise the contraction by stimulation with pulses of electricity.

CRT alleviates symptoms, such as breathlessness and fatigue, and reduces mortality, yet 30–40% of patients do not improve (non-responders). One of the most important modifiable causes of non-response to CRT is non-optimal positioning of the left ventricular lead.

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ESC guidelines advise placing the left ventricular lead at the back of the heart where late activation occurs, as this improves response to CRT.2 This is the current standard of care practice. The study focused on how to identify this site more precisely.

Previous randomised controlled trials have shown improved response to CRT, compared to standard care, when multimodality imaging is used to identify the latest mechanically activated segment for left ventricular lead placement. But multimodality imaging is time consuming and costly.

This study investigated whether lead placement at the region with the latest electrical activation would be superior to the region with the latest mechanical activation. The method uses electrical measurements obtained during the implant procedure and does not require pre-implant imaging.

The study design has been published.3 Briefly, 122 heart failure patients were randomly allocated to left ventricular lead placement at the latest electrically activated site (using electrical mapping) or the latest mechanically activated site (using imaging). Neither treatment is the current standard of care. Patients and staff responsible for follow-up care were blinded to the procedure. The primary outcome was change in left ventricular pump function (ejection fraction) at six months.

The absolute increase in left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly larger in the electrical group (11%) compared to the imaging group (7%; p=0.03). The difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for sex, baseline left ventricular ejection fraction and other factors.

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