SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Send us your Comments

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

Bringing the radiation risk discussion to the patient bedside Patients reluctantly in the dark when it comes to understanding imaging

Medtech industry dominated by megamergers totaling $40 billion last year: report But companies are consolidating due to pressure to lower prices

Senate adjourns with fate of SGR repeal uncertain, AMA voices displeasure AMA "extremely disappointed" with two week delay

Olympus unveils new FDA-endorsed reprocessing instructions for duodenoscopes New cleaning protocol achieves million-fold reduction in microbes

Increase in minimally-invasive procedures could save U.S. hospitals $280 to $340 million annually: study Also has a dramatic impact of complications and hospital length of stays

C. difficile 30-day readmissions nearly double those from other causes: study Study offers profound insight for hospitals, which will be penalized under the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program that CMS is starting

FDA issues separate MRI recalls to GE and Siemens The unrelated recalls pertain to 132 Siemens MRI systems and 9,369 GE MRI systems

Studies have yet to demonstrate HIEs improve speed, quality, safety and cost: paper Too soon to say hospitals received money’s worth from HIEs, said researchers

Most ER physicians order unnecessary imaging tests: study But will malpractice reform have any effect on that?

House passes SGR repeal with overwhelming majority After a vote of 392 to 37, legislation will go to the Senate

Stanford study uncovers
interesting information
about Type 2 diabetes.

Researchers use genetics-inspired approach to study environmental risk factors

by Heather Mayer , DOTmed News Reporter
Practicing the same method as geneticists use to study genetic factors for disease, researchers at Stanford University successfully used an environment-wide association study (EWAS) to study environmental factors for disease. The report appeared in the May 20 issue of PLoS, a journal of The Public Library of Science.

The researchers turned to EWAS as a way to study environmental risk factors because genetic-wide association studies have been so effective in recognizing genetic risk factors, says Atul Butte, researcher and assistant professor of pediatrics and medical informatics at Stanford University.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Dunlee - Design, Manufacture & Distribution of CT & Rad X-Ray Products

Dunlee manufactures replacement tubes for more CT systems than any other company in the industry. Philips, GE, Picker, Shimadzu, Siemens, Elscint or Toshiba replacement tubes for all popular systems. Call 800.238.3780



"Environmental factors haven't gotten the same kind of respect that the genetics field has," he says, pointing out that environmental factors are much stronger in affecting the development of Type 2 diabetes. "Environmental causes are certainly stronger. We wouldn't have the increase rate of Type 2 diabetes [that we do] from genetics because our genes aren't changing fast enough."

Butte and his team focused on Type 2 diabetes, which is a "public health menace," he says.

The scientists gathered public data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which looked at environmental risk factors such as nutrients, vitamins, allergens, pollutants and pesticides.

The data was all adjusted to account for factors including age, gender, body mass index and socioeconomic status.

Out of 226 environmental factors, the researchers found Type 2 diabetes association with tocopherol, a form of vitamin E, heptachlor epoxide, a pesticide that was outlawed in the 1980s, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are chemicals that were banned in the 1970s because of their association with cancer.

Edward McCabe, past president of American Society of Human Genetics and current physician-in-chief at Mattel Children's Hospital at UCLA, says the fact that the researchers were able to study 226 factors is "impressive."

Butte says he was "absolutely" surprised by the findings, especially the vitamin E association with Type 2 diabetes.

The researchers were also able to confirm that vitamin D and beta carotene possess protective properties. And they didn't even look at some factors, which have been proven as having an effect on Type 2 diabetes development.

"The most obvious factors are still always diet and exercise," Butte says. "What you eat still plays the largest role [in developing Type 2 diabetes]. We knew we would find some of those, so we didn't even look at those...This doesn't mean all of a sudden you can stop that diet or stop trying to lose weight."

Continue reading Researchers use genetics-inspired approach to study environmental risk factors...
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.
Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Center
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2015 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED