SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Send us your Comments

Never Miss a Story

Sign up for email alerts

 

More Industry Headlines

Medtech industry dominated by megamergers totaling $40 billion last year: report But companies are consolidating due to pressure to lower prices

Bringing the radiation risk discussion to the patient bedside Patients reluctantly in the dark when it comes to understanding imaging

Olympus unveils new FDA-endorsed reprocessing instructions for duodenoscopes New cleaning protocol achieves million-fold reduction in microbes

Senate adjourns with fate of SGR repeal uncertain, AMA voices displeasure AMA "extremely disappointed" with two week delay

Increase in minimally-invasive procedures could save U.S. hospitals $280 to $340 million annually: study Also has dramatic impact on complications, and length of hospital stay

C. difficile 30-day readmissions nearly double those from other causes: study Study offers profound insight for hospitals, which will be penalized under the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program that CMS is starting

FDA issues separate MRI recalls to GE and Siemens The unrelated recalls pertain to 132 Siemens MRI systems and 9,369 GE MRI systems

Studies have yet to demonstrate HIEs improve speed, quality, safety and cost: paper Too soon to say hospitals received money’s worth from HIEs, said researchers

Most ER physicians order unnecessary imaging tests: study But will malpractice reform have any effect on that?

House passes SGR repeal with overwhelming majority After a vote of 392 to 37, legislation will go to the Senate

On the battlefield, a new technique to prevent infection

by Olga Deshchenko , DOTmed News Reporter
In the combat zones of Afghanistan and Iraq, soldiers often suffer shrapnel wounds and burns as a result of improvised explosive device blasts.

But other threats - bacteria, viruses and fungi - linger in the air and soil. Contact with the soldiers' broken skin can lead to debilitating and potentially life-threatening infections.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Up To 80% Off on Medical Display Monitors! Call (832) 877-1250

We are wholesaler of pre-owned and new brand name medical display monitors. We have top brand grayscale and color LCD monitors with up to 3 years warranty and at least a 30 days money back guarantee at up to 80% off MSRP. DOTmed Certified



With the goal of developing a treatment that can be applied to soldiers' wounds at battle zones and hospitals to prevent infections, the U.S. Department of Defense allocated a $1.5 million grant to researchers at the University of Michigan and the NanoBio Corporation, the university announced Tuesday.

Researchers at the university's Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences and the Ann Arbor-based NanoBio Corp., a biopharmeceutical company, will use the money to study the effects of nanoemulsion-based therapies on curbing wound and burn infections in combat situations.

"A broadly effective nanoemulsion-based wound treatment that can be safely and easily applied at the time of injury, without causing pain or interfering with wound healing, would have great value to prevent infection, increase survival and enable more rapid healing of wounded United States military personnel," Dr. James R. Baker, the principal investigator for the grant, said in prepared remarks.

Nanoemulsions are made up of soybean oil, alcohol, water and surfactants emulsified into droplets 200 to 600 nanometers in diameter, according to the release. Research shows that nanoemulsions are effective in combating various bacteria and viruses.

The two research entities will develop 10 new nanoemulsion formulations against bacteria, fungi and spores in lab culture studies. The formulations will then be studied on animals for safety and effectiveness before moving on to human trials.

Nanoemulsions have shown promising results in other aspects of health care. The application of nanoemulsions for the treatment of cold sores is currently undergoing phase 3 clinical trials. Nanoemulsions have also been studied to treat cystic fibrosis infections and develop vaccines against influenza and bioterrorism agents.

The $1.5 million grant will be distributed to the University of Michigan and NanoBio Corp. over a three-year period.

Related:


Interested in Medical Industry News? Subscribe to DOTmed's weekly news email and always be informed. Click here, it takes just 30 seconds.
Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Center
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2015 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED