DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
Current Location:
> This Story

starstarstarstarempty star (1)
Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Send us your Comments



More Industry Headlines

MR and CT singled out as drivers of U.S. healthcare spending JAMA study finds scans are more expensive, abundant in U.S. than other high-income countries

Some GE imaging systems vulnerable to hacking: Homeland Security Research points to potential risks from use of default or hardcoded credentials in the systems

Philips taps Mass. General and Brigham & Women's to enhance digital pathology Using IntelliSite solution for clinical and research purposes

Russia's first proton therapy facility up and running in St. Petersburg Aims to treat 1,000 patients annually with two-room Varian ProBeam

Staff training to calm patients yields lower MR operating costs: study Free-standing imaging facilities saved $12,800 over 1,000 exams

What can we learn from the Amazon, JPMorgan, Berkshire venture? It's time to shake up this unsustainable health care system

New evidence supports mammography screening at age 40 Increasing detection by 19 percent with marginal increase in callbacks, biopsies

Ligature is this year’s regulatory heavy hitter Joint Commission takes aim at reducing environmental risks for suicide in health care setting

CereMetrix Silver neuroimaging analytics platform scores FDA approval Quantifies brain function down to the voxel level

Reducing infections in young patients There are special considerations to make when ensuring sanitary care for children

CyberKnife "valid option" for low-risk prostate cancer: study

by Brendon Nafziger , DOTmed News Associate Editor
A follow-up study using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation for low-risk prostate cancer found most patients had disease-free survival after five years, with little toxicity, results that researchers say could help bolster support for the treatment.

"In our mind, it's no longer investigational or experimental therapy," study co-author Dr. Debra E. Freeman, a radiation oncologist with CyberKnife Centers of Tampa Bay in Florida, told DOTmed News. "It's a valid option in the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer."

Story Continues Below Advertisement

The (#1 Resource) for Medical Imaging and Peripherals. Call 1-949-273-8000

As a Master Distributor for major brands Barco, Philips, and Sony, we offer custom imaging solutions. With our renowned OEM Solutions and Service/Repair Center, Ampronix is a one-stop shop for HD Medical LCD Displays--Printers--Recorders--4K Cameras

CyberKnife is a robotic radiosurgery device made by Accuray Inc. of Sunnyvale, Calif., which can deliver "hypofractionated" treatments -- that is, high doses of radiation precisely sculpted to the tumor or target, and delivered in a smaller number of sessions. It was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat tumors anywhere in the body around nine years ago.

For the study, the patients received between 35 and 36.25 Gy in five fractions.

Freeman said slower growing, "indolent" prostate cancers are thought to respond better to hypofractionated treatment, as opposed to radiotherapy treatments where smaller doses are spread out over a longer time. "They are not exquisitely sensitive to low doses of radiation, and are more sensitive and respond more to higher doses of radiation," she said.

More aggressive, faster spreading cancers tend to be treated with lower, more frequent doses, she said.

In the study, published online this week in Radiation Oncology, researchers examined results from a pooled group of 41 patients from Stanford, Calif. and Naples, Fla., who received treatment between 2003 and 2005. The main endpoint was biochemical disease-free survival after five years, a standard measure that looks at whether prostate-specific antigen levels remain low and stable following treatment, suggesting disease is absent.

For the patients, at a median five years after therapy the biochemical disease-free survival was around 93 percent, results comparable with surgery and other forms of radiation therapy, Freeman said.

Toxic side effects from zapping the prostate were also rare, with no rectal bleeding or ulcerations, and no significant damage to the bladder, Freeman said.

"With any kind of radiation, there's a risk of some damage," she said. "You can't really get to the prostate with radiation without brushing by the bladder and the rectum on the way there. They can be injured in surgery, as well."

However, one patient did have a urologic problem, but Freeman said it was unclear if it was caused by the radiation treatment or an earlier procedure used to dilate the urethra because of difficulties passing urine.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>


Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018, Inc.