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Could you identify a stroke?

by Philip F. Jacobus, CEO | June 17, 2015
My friend, Don Bogutski, frequently forwards me emails designed to help me improve my life. I skim them and, for the most part, they do not apply to me.

However, today, he sent me a very interesting email about stroke identification.

According to Don's email, one in 10 people are at risk for suffering a stroke. We are working longer hours, getting less sleep, eating less healthy and dealing with more stress, all of which contributes to our susceptibility.

The email suggested that if a neurologist can treat a stroke victim within three hours, the effects of the stroke can be totally reversed and the trick is to recognize the symptoms. I would like to pass along the advice from his email.

If you see a friend who has fainted or fallen or seems to be disoriented, even if they have regained their composure, here is a four step test to help rule out stroke:

1. Ask the individual to smile.

2. Ask the individual to speak a simple sentence, i.e. I live in New York City.

3. Ask the individual to raise their arms.

4. Ask the individual to stick out their tongue.


If the person has difficulty with any of these tasks, or if their tongue is crooked, it is very likely they have experienced a stroke. In which case you must pick up the phone, call 9-1-1, and explain the situation.

Again, according to Don's email, if a doctor can get to the patient within three hours, they can totally reverse the effects of the stroke.

The more informed we are about these kinds of tests and symptoms, the more likely we are to mitigate the damage that strokes can cause.

It is better to be safe than sorry.

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About Phil Jacobus

Phil Jacobus has been involved in health care since 1977, when he visited China to sell equipment. He has done business in 35 countries and still travels extensively. Phil is active in charity, helps rural clinics and always tries to help DOTmed users when he can.

Phil is a member of AHRA, HFMA, AAMI and the Cryogenic Society of America. He has contributed to a number of magazines and journals and has addressed trade groups.

Phil's proudest achievement is that he has been happily married to his wife Barbara since 1989, who helped him found DOTmed in 1998.

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