DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
>
> This Story

Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

MRI Homepage

Researchers bring high-resolution MR imaging to nanometer scale

Carestream Health exhibiting medical imaging products at ASMIRT

Israel includes Neuravive focused ultrasound for essential tremor in health services plan

Global radiation dose to reach an estimated $3,066.1 million by 2025

Canon Medical Systems’ Vantage Galan 3T XGO Edition receives FDA clearance

Rapid blood vessel scan tolerated by claustrophobic patients unable to stand longer tests

Standard medical tests miss nearly two-thirds of heart attack diagnoses

Global medical imaging devices market is expected to generate revenue of $46.65 billion by 2023

Profound Medical completes patient enrollment in TACT pivotal clinical trial

MR Solutions launches the most advanced Spectrometer for clinical MR manufacturers

Explaining bursts of activity in brains of preterm babies

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style
12 September 2017

The source of spontaneous, high-amplitude bursts of activity seen in the brains of preterm babies, which are vital for healthy development, has been identified by a team led by researchers at UCL and King’s College London.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

The (#1 Resource) for Medical Imaging and Peripherals. Call 1-949-273-8000

As a Master Distributor for major brands Barco, Philips, and Sony, we offer custom imaging solutions. With our renowned OEM Solutions and Service/Repair Center, Ampronix is a one-stop shop for HD Medical LCD Displays--Printers--Recorders--4K Cameras



In a new study published in eLife and funded by the National Institute for Health Research and the Medical Research Council, the researchers found that a specific brain region called the insula plays a major role in the generation of the spontaneous neuronal bursts.

The researchers say the spontaneous brain activity is essential to strengthen brain connections which will serve as ‘scaffolding’ that will then develop further with life experience. Other studies have found that infants whose brains don’t display this activity are more likely to develop cerebral palsy or have poor cognitive skills later in life.

“While we don’t yet know what causes these neuronal bursts, we know that in healthy babies, they are present preterm and disappear at full term. It’s a bad sign if they are absent in preterm or present still after full term,” said one of the study’s lead authors, Dr Lorenzo Fabrizi (UCL Biosciences). “The brain of a preterm baby is not merely a downsized version of that of an adult, but is uniquely designed to prepare itself for the external world.”

For the study, the team identified the source of the most common type of bursts, called delta brush events, in 10 healthy preterm infants aged 32-36 postmenstrual weeks using a simultaneous combination of two techniques: an electroencephalogram (EEG) to identify the signal and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to map its location.

The EEG does not give precise spatial information, so the researchers matched the timings of the neuronal activity with fMRI readings, which provide better spatial data by measuring blood flow throughout the brain.

The infants wore custom-made caps fitted with electrodes to record the EEG and were then put inside the MRI scanner when asleep. As EEG and fMRI had not been used simultaneously on babies before, it was a challenging experiment to set up as the authors had to be very careful to ensure the babies did not experience any discomfort during the tests.

The researchers found that the bursts came from the insula, which is one of the most densely connected hubs in the developing cortex. The study findings correspond with previous evidence that the insula enters a crucial phase of development during the late-term period studied.

As a major source of the transient bursting events that are critical for brain maturation, the researchers say the insula’s preterm activity warrants further scientific investigation in both humans and animal models.

“This may offer new and exciting opportunities for monitoring how brain activity develops in preterm babies and a new understanding of how early irregularities can ultimately lead to disability. Most research in early brain development focuses on structures instead of functions, so we’re hopeful that our methods can be used further to enhance our understanding of brain function before birth,” said the study’s first author, Dr Tomoki Arichi (King’s College London).

MRI Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED