DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
>
> This Story

Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

Health IT Homepage

After EMR implementation, surgeons spend less time interacting with patients

ZHealth launches new cardiovascular software that improves both documentation and coding accuracy

Future Health Index, commissioned by Philips, identifies recommendations for better health information exchange to drive value

LUMEDX rolls out comprehensive cardiovascular information system at major academic medical center

QuartzClinical launches cloud-based healthcare data analytics platform

Volpara Health Technologies attains ISO27001 information security certification

Waystar to acquire Connance, expanding revenue cycle and predictive analytics technology for health systems and hospitals

Over $150 million in inaccurate revenue identified by Pareto Intelligence's data integrity solution

CareCloud teams with Google Cloud to accelerate interoperability among outpatient providers

aycan installs PACS at Rochester Regional's mobile mammography center

Wireless networks are not as fast, secure, reliable or energy-efficient as wired systems, says new report

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style
WASHINGTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A public policy report on the Internet and the future of landlines and wireless networks, “Re-Inventing Wires: The Future of Landlines and Networks,” was published online today by the National Institute for Science, Law & Public Policy (NISLAPP) in Washington, D.C. Because broadband networks and the Internet have become vital components of our nation’s physical, cultural and social structure, the future of these networks, the report says, must be steered towards the fastest, most reliable and future-proof, and secure infrastructure available. Such infrastructure would be wired, not wireless.

Dr. Timothy Schoechle, author of the report and Senior Research Fellow at NISLAPP, says, “We are seeing the present national emphasis on wireless technologies because the 'triopoly' of Verizon, AT&T, and Comcast that dominates our access to the Internet imposes artificial scarcity, planned obsolescence, and high prices to maintain their immense profits. It is in their interest to obscure the fact that advanced copper and optical fiber are far superior to wireless in both cost and performance.”

Story Continues Below Advertisement

THE (LEADER) IN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1982. SALES-SERVICE-REPAIR

Special-Pricing Available on Medical Displays, Patient Monitors, Recorders, Printers, Media, Ultrasound Machines, and Cameras.This includes Top Brands such as SONY, BARCO, NDS, NEC, LG, EDAN, EIZO, ELO, FSN, PANASONIC, MITSUBISHI, OLYMPUS, & WIDE.



From a broad analysis of available data, “Re-Inventing Wires: The Future of Landlines and Networks” demonstrates wireless systems cannot provide long-term solutions for universal, reliable and affordable Internet accessibility, nor support the ever-increasing data rates that will be needed in the near future for each American home and business. Investment in wired, not wireless, information infrastructure is needed across the U.S. right now.

Schoechle says, “Government officials have been misled about the adequacy of wireless communications. Legislators should stop enabling the wireless industry’s plans for massive new deployments of 4G LTE and soon 5G millimeter wave antennas throughout American neighborhoods, and instead commit to supporting reliable, energy-efficient and enduring hard-wired telecommunications infrastructure that meets the nation’s immediate and long-term needs.”

“Re-Inventing Wires: The Future of Landlines and Networks” explains why on technological, and other grounds, including the energy guzzling nature of wireless antennas and networks, an intensely wireless approach to communications, now being planned by the wireless industry, is the wrong direction, and very clearly not in the public’s best interest.

“Largely due to failures and consequences of the Telecommunications Act of 1996,” Schoechle says, “the Internet is not living up to its potential. It has been hijacked by the commercial motivations that have come to re-define and constrain the availability, quality, content, and media of high-speed access in the United States.... While other countries are investing to assure citizens’ access to a fast and reliable information highway, U.S. legislators appear asleep at the switch, captured by the wireless industry and its lobbyists.”

Importantly, “Reinventing Wires: The Future of Landlines and Networks” explains the renaissance that has occurred in wired technologies in recent years and how these advances offer tremendous potential for America’s sustainable connectivity of the future, one that is fast, equitable, safe, secure, and energy-efficient.

The paper, “Re-Inventing Wires: The Future of Landlines and Networks,” will be presented as part of a panel at The Commonwealth Club of California, Monday, February 5th at 5:30 p.m. in San Francisco, CA.

Health IT Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED