DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

Women's Health Homepage

A 21st century approach to TLC: Leveraging technology to improve care A wire-free, non-radioactive system for localizing non-palpable breast lesions

The importance of breast MR screening for high-risk patients Experts weigh in on MR's emerging role in breast cancer diagnostics

Ensuring adherence to mammo screening exams Early diagnosis means less aggressive, less costly treatment

Women's health market trends Purchasing insights from the experts at MD Buyline

Reducing downtime using machine data analytics How new technology helps predict the next breakdown before it happens

AI to workflow, breast imaging makes advances A look at the latest innovations reaching the healthcare marketplace

Q&A with Jack Kolosky, Executive VP and COO of Moffitt Cancer Center The challenges and accomplishments of a Florida-based cancer center

Dense breast tissue and automated breast ultrasound Understanding what ABUS can mean for the future of diagnosing cancer in dense tissue

The future of precision medicine Insights from Robert A. Cascella leader of Philips’ Diagnosis & Treatment businesses

Taking the mystery out of breast density One state at a time, awareness is spreading across the country

Automated ultrasound guidance streamlines epidural placement for challenging patients in labor

By Dr. Regina Fragneto

It’s no secret that childbirth hurts. For most women, it is characterized by intense pain and pressure in the lower abdomen and back – and for some, this can be overwhelming. Many patients choose relief through epidural analgesia, which involves injection of a local anesthetic near nerve roots in the lumbar spinal region. This inhibits nerve conduction, decreasing sensation in the lower half of the body.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

THE (LEADER) IN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY SINCE 1982. SALES-SERVICE-REPAIR

Special-Pricing Available on Medical Displays, Patient Monitors, Recorders, Printers, Media, Ultrasound Machines, and Cameras.This includes Top Brands such as SONY, BARCO, NDS, NEC, LG, EDAN, EIZO, ELO, FSN, PANASONIC, MITSUBISHI, OLYMPUS, & WIDE.



But pain relief itself can hurt. Physicians must caution patients that epidural analgesia can lead to complications and some pain may be associated with the epidural procedure itself, adding to anxiety during an already anxious time. These complications can include spinal headache, which can be severe, and soreness at the site of the epidural. While the risk is minimal for the average patient, in certain populations – among them women with high body mass index (BMI) and scoliosis or other spinal deformities – it may be greater due to technical difficulties associated with the epidural delivery. In addition, problematic anesthesia delivery is painful to the medical system due to increased costs of prolonged procedures and patient discomfort and dissatisfaction.

Even in today’s advanced healthcare age, epidural delivery can be difficult because many anesthesiologists continue to perform the procedure as if they had virtual blinders on. When attempting to pinpoint the optimal site for injection of a powerful drug, they still rely on their sense of touch to assess spinal anatomy. In obese patients and those with spinal anomalies, needle placement is challenging because physicians cannot successfully palpate the spine to determine the appropriate injection site.

Image guidance for epidural placement would remove the physician’s virtual blindfold to improve accuracy. However, many imaging modalities involve X-ray exposure, which should be avoided in a woman carrying a fetus.

Ultrasound, however, involves no radiation, and research has shown the technology helpful in accurately identifying the appropriate epidural injection site. But performing and interpreting ultrasound requires specialized training and experience that is not in some anesthesiologists’ skill set.

Modern technological advances have led to the development of a range of specialized ultrasound devices, including the novel Accuro device by Rivanna Medical (Charlottesville, Virginia). The device applies automated 3D-navigation to spinal ultrasound imaging, eliminating the steep learning curve of interpreting and using ultrasound images to support epidural anesthesia administration. Accuro provides anesthesiologists, regardless of their ultrasound experience, with a clear route to the appropriate epidural site.
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Women's Health Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED