dismiss

Clean Sweep Live Auction on Thur. March 28th. Click to view the full inventory

DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
>
> This Story

Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
Advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Molecular Imaging Homepage

Enigma Biomedical Group signs license agreement with Merck for novel MK-6884 imaging agent

DOSIsoft PLANET Onco Dose receives FDA clearance for molecular imaging & molecular radiotherapy dosimetry

Improving molecular imaging using a deep learning approach

Nuclear medicine imaging monitors effectiveness of therapy for melanoma patients

Vect-Horus and RadioMedix announce signing of a letter of intent to co-develop a radio-theranostic agent for Glioblastoma

Siemens Healthineers announces first U.S. installation of Biograph Vision PET/CT system in Philadelphia

RWTH Aachen’s ExMI Institute expands molecular imaging capabilities with MILabs’ Integrated Optical/CT system

PET scans show biomarkers could spare some breast cancer patients from chemotherapy

Cerveau Technologies and Institut de Radiofarmacia Aplicada de Barcelona to manufacture investigational tau ligand, [18F]MK-6240

Novel PET/CT imaging agent shows promise for safe and effective diagnosis of acute venous thromboembolism

New PET tracer identified for imaging Tau in Alzheimer's disease patients

Press releases may be edited for formatting or style
In the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and the search for effective treatments, tau tangles in the brain have joined amyloid build-up as markers of the disease and potential therapy targets. In the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, the featured article of the month reports on the identification of a promising second-generation positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for imaging and measuring tau pathology.

"We compared three novel tau-specific radiopharmaceuticals--11C-RO-963, 11C-RO-643, and 18F-RO-948--that showed pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo promise for use in imaging human tau (Honer et al., JNM, April 2018)," explains Dean F. Wong, MD, PhD, Johns Hopkins University professor of radiology, neurology, psychiatry and neurosciences and director of the Division of Nuclear Medicine's Section of High Resolution Brain PET Imaging.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Has exclusive distribution agreement with DDD to sell new Camera systems

UMRi provides the very best new & refurbished gamma cameras, quality parts &repair services. We also rebuild & replace camera detectors, move camera systems across town or across the country. Call us at 888-239-3510



In this first human evaluation of these novel radiotracers, healthy humans and patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied using an innovative study design to perform head-to-head comparisons of the three compounds in a pairwise fashion. Wong states, "This design allowed us to select one radioligand, 18F-R0-948, as the most promising second-generation tau radiopharmaceutical for larger scale use in human PET tau imaging."

Over all brain regions and subjects, the trend was for 18F-RO-948 to have the highest standardized uptake value (SUVpeak), followed by 11C-RO-963 and then 11C-RO-643. Regional analysis of SUV ratio and total distribution volume for 11C-RO-643 and 18F-RO-948 clearly discriminated the AD group from the healthy control groups. Compartmental modeling confirmed that 11C-RO-643 had lower brain entry than either 11C-RO-963 or 18F-RO-948 and that 18F-RO-948 showed better contrast between areas of high versus low tau accumulation.

Subsequent analysis therefore focused on 18F-RO-948. Both voxelwise and region-based analysis of 18F-RO-948 binding in healthy controls versus AD subjects revealed multiple areas where AD subjects significantly differed from healthy controls. Voxelwise analysis also revealed a set of symmetric clusters where AD subjects had higher binding than healthy controls.

"Importantly, this new tracer appears to have much less off-target binding than was reported for existing tau tracers," notes Wong. "Especially, it has less binding to the choroid plexus adjacent to the hippocampus, which has confounded interpretation of mesial temporal tau measured by first generation PET Tau tracers."
  Pages: 1 - 2 - 3 >>

Molecular Imaging Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED