DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

CT Homepage

3-D printed middle-ear to correct hearing loss shows promise at RSNA Further evidence of CT and 3-D printing synergy

CT study gives further pause about possible football health risks High rate of enlarged aortas increase risk of life-threatening aneurysm

Top 10 trends and takeaways from RSNA 2017 Are radiologists going the way of the dodo bird? Of course not / Yes, yes they are

Expert makes the case for patient access to radiology reports Patients want a more active role in their care

Philips unveils IQon Elite Spectral CT system and IntelliSpace Portal 10 platform at RSNA Capturing data, then bringing it to life (or printing it)

At RSNA, physicians explain how radiologists can leverage VR Bridging the communication gap between diagnostics and the operating room

Hitachi unveils single broad-based ultrasound probe at RSNA 'Unlike any other in the sector'

Samsung Neurologica introduces its first new mobile CT in over a decade The 16-slice OmniTom already installed in Boston hospital

GE plans to integrate MedyMatch's AI platform with CT systems Helps clinicians better detect stroke

Infervision harnesses deep learning for lung cancer, stroke screening Makes RSNA debut with CT artificial intelligence tools

Patients at hospital-based clinics more likely to get unnecessary services: Study

by Lauren Dubinsky , Senior Reporter
Patients with back pain, headaches and upper respiratory infections are more likely to receive low-value care at hospital-based primary care clinics than at community-based primary care clinics.

Those were the findings of a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

CT, MRI, NM, SPECT/CT, PET & PET/CT service, refurbished systems and parts

Accelerate your ROI with our Black Diamond Certified refurbished systems. One year warranty - ISO 13485 Certified - FDA registered - Over 65k parts in inventory



Providers at hospital-based clinics were shown to refer too many patients to specialists and order too many CT, MR and X-ray exams. This brings into question the value of care that is delivered in these settings.

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA compared the records of 31,000 appointments over a 17-year period from two national databases. They excluded patients with complex symptoms that suggested serious disorders.

They found that the hospital-based clinics and community-based clinics prescribed antibiotics at about the same rate. But those who visited hospital clinics were referred for MR and CT exams more than those who went to community clinics — 8 percent and 6 percent, respectively.

Thirteen percent of hospital-based clinic patients were referred for X-rays compared to 9 percent for community-based clinic patients. The biggest difference involved those evaluated by a specialist — 19 percent versus about 8 percent, respectively.

Dr. John Mafi, the study’s lead author and physician at UCLA, speculated that physicians working in hospitals may be more likely to refer patients for those imaging procedures because they’re more immediately accessible and convenient.

Mafi and his team concluded that the key factor driving the disparity is the location of the clinic rather than whether the clinic is owned by a hospital or physician. Besides referring patients to specialists more often, hospital-owned clinics delivered similar quality care to physician-owned clinics.

“An estimated one-third of health care spending in the United States stems from services that provide low-value care,” Mafi said in a statement. “Reducing the use of such services can not only help curb health care costs — and redirect such resources in more meaningful ways — but it can also protect patients from the potentially harmful effects associated with them.”

The patients who were most likely to receive unnecessary tests and services were those visiting hospital-based primary care clinics and seeing someone other than their usual physician. That shows that patients may be over-tested when they jump from physician to physician.

“Not seeing your regular primary care physician — what we call discontinuity of care — might be a weak spot where low-value care can creep in,” Dr. Bruce Landon, the study’s senior author and professor at Harvard Medical School, said in a statement. “The more we know about what situations are most likely to lead to patients receiving low-value care, the more we can do to prevent it.”

CT Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2017 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED