dismiss

Clean Sweep Live Auction on Wed. January 30th. Click to view the full inventory

DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment
advertisement

 

advertisement

 

Molecular Imaging Homepage

Former South African nuclear executives to appeal suspensions in court Involves monthslong shutdown of NTP Radioisotopes medical isotope plant

FDA grants Fast Track designation to 64-Cu-Dotatate Used in PET diagnostic exams for suspected neuroendocrine tumors

Progenics Pharmaceuticals selects Curium as European distributor of PyL Imaging agent for visualizing prostate cancer

GE and VUMC partner to make cancer immunotherapy safer and more precise Five-year collab will yield new AI apps and PET tracers

Top molecular imaging stories of 2018 Last year's biggest news regarding PET and SPECT

APRINOIA and Celgene partner on promising PET tracer APN-1607 holds potential for visualizing tau pathology in diverse tauopathies

Subtle Medical closes RSNA with CE mark and FDA clearance of PET AI solution Speeds up scans by factor of four, enhanced image quality

Siemens unveils syngo Virtual Cockpit software for CT, MR and PET at RSNA Offers remote expert technicians when needed

Total-body PET scanner produces landmark human images First ever simultaneously captured 3-D image of the entire human body

South African NTP Radioisotopes facility reopens following year-long closure Will help alleviate worldwide shortages of Mo-99 and other isotopes

Editorial takes aim at NRC efforts to lower the bar for nuclear medicine providers

by Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter
“The NRC has abdicated its role as a protection agency for patients. Its policy in the past and current rulemaking considerations have been overreaching the commission’s purview and defeat the very purpose of its existence, which is protecting public health and safety!”

So stated a recent editorial by Dr. Aria Razmaria and Dr. Jeremie Calais of the Ahmanson Translational Theranostics Division, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and Journal of Nuclear Medicine editor-in-chief Dr. Johannes Czernin. The opinion piece was presented as the views of the authors alone and not of any organizations they work with.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Servicing GE Nuclear Medicine equipment with OEM trained engineers

We offer full service contracts, PM contracts, rapid response, time and material,camera relocation. Nuclear medicine equipment service provider since 1975. Click or call now for more information 800 96 NUMED



At issue is the push by the NRC to ease training requirements for authorized users, which would increase the number of people allowed to provide radionuclide therapy.

Why would the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) consider easing requirements? According to the authors it is due to “a presumed future shortage of authorized users,” stemming from the present alternate pathway requirements of 700 hours of training and experience – about 4 months of training.

The NRC has now asked for comments on the issue, with an ending deadline of January 29, 2019.

The authors asked, “who has an interest in further diluting requirements for practicing therapeutic nuclear medicine and theranostics? Here is a simple suggestion: follow the money.”

Pointing a finger at the radiopharmaceutical industry, they argued that the emerging potential of targeted radionuclide therapies will generate large revenue streams, and that more authorized users would likely mean more therapy and more money. “This is how markets work. This is not a bad thing as long as it does not compromise quality of care and patient safety," they wrote.

The money trail, argued the authors, leads to the NRC as well, which supports itself with user fees. “As a consequence,” they stated, “there is a direct incentive for the NRC to issue as many authorized user licenses as possible – this is, in our view, a perfect example of a conflict of interest that cannot be managed.”

The premise that there is a bottleneck created by present training requirements is, itself, not supported by data, they advised.

“Based on annually published American Board of Nuclear Medicine data and by conservative estimates, the current nuclear medicine workforce consists of approximately 1,200 board-certified nuclear medicine physicians across the United States. Based on projections of future needs in radionuclide therapies, approximately 150 new theranostic centers across the United States would be needed to deliver approximately 150,000–200,000 treatment cycles per year (assuming 4 cycles, per patient for up to 50,000 patients per year). Each of these sites would treat 1,000–1,250 patients per year or 5–7 patients per day. The current ABNM-certified workforce in the United States and the expected addition of new ABNM-certified physicians in the upcoming years of approximately 50–60 ABNM diplomates per year will easily meet this demand.”
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Molecular Imaging Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2019 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED