DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

Oncology Homepage

Stereotactic partial breast radiation therapy as safe as conventional radiotherapy Study shows CyberKnife can reduce patient burden with comparable outcomes

Tokyo researchers develop palm-sized gamma camera Capable of high-resolution, multicolor 3-D molecular imaging

Cancers detected sooner since ACA screenings went into effect Early diagnoses increased by one percent under Obama's signature legislation: Study

New 3-D photoacoustic imaging may speed breast cancer cell detection Checking tumor margins in the operating room

Study finds MR is cost-effective for detecting prostate cancer, guiding biopsies Research suggests may be superior to transrectal ultrasound

PET/CT study aims to reduce pediatric brain cancer deaths from 90 percent Using imaging to predict tumor drug uptake

Ultrasound aids in delivery of brachytherapy in prostate cancer patients Researchers at ESTRO tout benefits, patient appeal

Men may need more frequent lung cancer CT screening than women Research in Asia points to lifestyle factors impacting development

Bilateral breast removal deemed overtreatment in DCIS cancer cases Risk of cancer in the opposite breast is 5.6 percent after 10 years: Study

Elekta's MR radiotherapy system Unity unveiled at ESTRO 'Huge milestone' delivers treatment while simultaneously generating images

Cold cap can combat hair loss from chemo for breast cancer

by Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter
A cooling cap that prevents hair loss during chemotherapy has come through its clinical trials and can make a huge difference to the quality of life of patients, Dr. Paula Klein, medical director, Breast Cancer Clinical Trials, Mount Sinai Health System in New York told NY1.

One such happy patient was Donna Tookes, a patient who was treated with the cap during her breast cancer therapy and had been resigned to hair loss. She told the station, “I accepted it.”

Story Continues Below Advertisement

Our products help save lives every single day

Getinge is a leading global provider of innovative solutions for operating rooms, intensive-care units, hospital wards, sterilization departments, elderly care and for life sciences companies and institutions. Click to read more



In fact, she did not have to.

Thanks to her participation in a trial of the Dignicap from Dignitana headed by Klein, she didn't lose any hair at all.

The cap “literally freezes the scalp so that it shuts down blood vessels,” Klein told NY1. “Less chemotherapy is delivered to the scalp.”

The cap Klein used pumps coolant through it. The patient's hair is wet and this keeps the temperature of scalp and hair near freezing during therapy. This constricts the blood vessels in the region, and thus reduces the amount of anti-cancer drugs that reach hair follicles.

The scalp-cooling technique has been in use for years in Europe, but is only now gaining FDA clearance and seeing greater use in the U.S. There had been fears that sparing the scalp from treatment might allow cancer to spread to that area. But clinical evidence from Europe has now suggested that this is not the case.

“In Europe they do not show a significant increase in scalp metastases,” said Klein.

The cooling system which chills the hair and scalp to just above freezing during therapy received the agency's okay for a multicenter clinical trial in 2015.

“Some of today’s most powerful, lifesaving chemotherapy treatments still cause complete hair loss, a side effect that many women consider to be emotionally devastating,” Dr. Hope S. Rugo, principal investigator for the study and Director of Breast Oncology and Clinical Trials Education at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center noted in a 2015 statement about the trials.

In the Mt. Sinai trials about seven out of 10 early-stage breast cancer patients kept at least half their hair without any negative events linked to the cooling cap.



The FDA clearance is, for the present, limited to early-stage breast cancer, but Klein stated that she thinks it will eventually find more widespread use.

“I am extremely excited to finally be able to offer patients scalp cooling during chemotherapy, which allows them to retain normalcy and privacy in their lives,” she stressed.

For patients, the loss of hair is among the most important chemo side effects, according to a 2008 article published in the journal Psycho-Oncology by Julie Lemieux, Elizabeth Maunsell and Louise Provencher.

They found that “chemotherapy-induced hair loss is considered to be the most important side effect of chemotherapy, frequently ranking among the first three for breast cancer patients, and can lead to refusal of chemotherapy. Secondly, it is described by breast cancer women as causing distress and as being traumatizing. Thirdly, there might be an impact on body image, although not all studies reported this association.”

Oncology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2017 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED