DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

 

Oncology Homepage

Researchers develop AI approach for high-risk clinical tumor volumes Assisting low- and middle-income countries that lack contouring expertise

Dr. Benjamin Movsas American Radium Society Names president-elect

Tennessee governor vetoes state employee proton therapy coverage Would require PT to be covered under the same aggregate amount as IMRT

European medical center first to perform linac-based MR-guided RT using on-table adaptation Made possible with ViewRay's MRIdian Linac

Hospital in Italy performs radiosurgery with Brainlab's Elements Spine SRS software Automatically plans treatments for complex parts of the body

AI approach used to study Mars now assessing tumor response to therapies Could reduce sample sizes and accelerate process for approval of cancer therapies

Thermal imaging in development could provide real-time ablation views Taking guesswork and additional imaging out of the equation

PPI to purchase Elekta MR-linac systems for £25 million Will install at five cancer centers across the UK

Dr. Nancy P. Mendenhall Medical Director of UF Health Proton Therapy selected by University of Florida as 2018 Clinical Science Researcher of the Year

ViewRay showcases enhancements to MRIdian Linac system at ESTRO Will offer MR pulse sequencing capabilities

Many older breast cancer patients still receive too much radiation: study

by Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter
Over half of older women with early stage breast cancer received more radiation therapy than what might be medically necessary, according to a new study based on 2011 data.

"Our study provides an example of a win-win situation, where patients can receive high-quality, evidence-based cancer care while also reducing the treatment burden for patients and the health care system," lead author Dr. Rachel A. Greenup, assistant professor of surgery at Duke University Medical Center Cancer Institute in Durham, North Carolina, stated.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

The (#1 Resource) for Medical Imaging and Peripherals. Call 1-949-273-8000

As a Master Distributor for major brands Barco, Philips, and Sony, we offer custom imaging solutions. With our renowned OEM Solutions and Service/Repair Center, Ampronix is a one-stop shop for HD Medical LCD Displays--Printers--Recorders--4K Cameras



The findings were reported in the March 14 issue of the Journal of Oncology Practice.

Greenup and colleagues, including senior author Dr. E. Shelley Hwang, chief of breast surgery at the Duke Cancer Institute, looked at data from the National Cancer Database to find over 43,000 breast cancer patients aged 50 and older who had received radiation therapy. Total cost of the therapy these patients received was about $420.2 million.

These patients were those with small tumors that had not spread to the lymph nodes, and which were excised with lumpectomies.

“Had this group of women been treated with the alternative approaches that evidence suggests are as effective, the cost was estimated at $256.2 million — a potential savings of $164 million,” the study found.

Earlier studies have demonstrated that such patients do “as well” with four weeks as with the more traditional six weeks of radiation, the researchers stated. There has also been a study that showed that those over age 70 saw no significant boost in survival rates from radiation compared with the use of post-op tamoxifen.

The data showed that despite such evidence “57 percent of patients who were potentially eligible to reduce or forgo radiation still received the longer, costlier regimens,” stated the researchers.

Medicare reimbursement data showed that the difference in radiation course was $13,000 vs. $8,000 for six- vs. eight-week regimens. There was no financial data on other insurance.

Breast cancer treatment costs could hit $20 billion in 2020, according to National Cancer Institute statistics, stated Greenup. "Of course high-quality care is the priority in cancer treatment,” she stressed, but noted that use of “evidence-based radiation treatment” could cut costs without “without sacrificing quality."

That said, the decision to shorten radiation regimens should not be decided based only on this study, she and other experts noted, in that the databases used offered no information on why longer courses were given to patients.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Oncology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED