DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
SEARCH
Current Location:
>
> This Story


Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment

 

Oncology Homepage

Robotic-assisted transhiatal esophagectomy is safe and effective for certain patients But it's a complex procedure to perform

Margarita Valdez American Society for Radiation oncology hires new assistant director of congressional relations

J. Michael Bruff Varian announces new VP of Investor Relations

Louisiana hospitals deploy Synaptive's BrightMatter technology Builds on earlier investments in neuroscience

Varian to market Bionix brachytherapy applicators in North America Two tools for treating upper GI and anal/rectal cancers

Accuray’s TomoTherapy more effective than Varian’s RapidArc, non-randomized study finds French study examined outcomes for 166 patients

Cancer patient in Italy first to undergo Varian HyperArc radiotherapy Delivers compact radiation doses to tumors with improved targeting

New PET tracer for prostate cancer shows benefits over current standard: study 11C-sarcosine could also be used for other cancers

Praveen Dalmia Karmanos Cancer Institute appoints new corporate director of Oncology Technology & Innovation

Study finds majority of insurance denials overturned in pediatric proton patients Policy language may need revising

Mayo Clinic has a Hitachi PROBEAT-V
proton therapy system
Courtesy: Hitachi

New Arizona research may aid proton therapy precision

by Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter
The collaboration between Arizona State University and the Mayo Clinic that gave the state its first proton therapy facility is starting to pay research dividends.

ASU postdoc physics researcher Jason Holmes is designing devices that will help improve beam accuracy and make therapy safer.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

New & Refurbished C-Arm Systems. Call 702.384.0085 Today!

KenQuest provides all major brands of surgical c-arms (new and refurbished) and carries a large inventory for purchase or rent. With over 20 years in the medical equipment business we can help you fulfill your equipment needs



Holmes is working on devices that will more accurately identify the location of protons in the patient's body, and also the number that reach their target.

The Mayo Clinic's Martin Bues, head proton physicist for its radiation oncology department, stressed the utility of the postdoc's work.

“The beauty of Jason’s device, if it, in fact, works, is that all uncertainty will be removed because his device will actually measure in real time, in living breathing patients, where the beam stops,” he noted.

“In order to use proton beam therapy to the fullest, we need to know, with the highest possible precision, where the beam will stop,” he advised.

Holmes is working on a prototype range detector that could be more accurate than today's methods, which can determine the range of a proton to about a centimeter. “You can’t really use this to help the patient, to help their outcome, until you get within around a millimeter,” he told The State Press.

He also has a prototype proton counter. This works by first sending the beam through a diamond and then into the patient's body.

“I’m literally talking about ‘there goes one proton, then another, there’s another,’” Holmes noted, advising that, “if you know how much energy is being deposited into a patient, and where it is being deposited, then you know basically everything you need to know,” and adding, “that’s what all of our projects are trying to do.”

His advisor, Ricardo Alarcon, noted that the range detector will mean that, “it'll be the first time we will be doing this therapy and will be actually looking at what is happening while the treatment is being conducted.”

The collaboration between ASU and Mayo Clinic that led to the proton facility began in 2015. Although the center came with a hefty $182 million price tag, the Mayo Clinic has a new business model, relying on private donations rather than loans, that officials say will lower treatment costs to be in line with other modalities for cancer care.

“We have taken all the risk on this,” Dr. Sameer Keole, a radiation oncologist and center director, told The Arizona Daily Star.
  Pages: 1 - 2 >>

Oncology Homepage


You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Advertise
Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Directory
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Requests
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Requests
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
Jobs/Training
Find/Fill
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Quotes
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Quotes
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to DOTmed.com, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2017 DOTmed.com, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED