DOTmed Home MRI Oncology Ultrasound Molecular Imaging X-Ray Cardiology Health IT Business Affairs
News Home Parts & Service Operating Room CT Women's Health Proton Therapy Endoscopy HTMs Mobile Imaging
Current Location:
> This Story

Log in or Register to rate this News Story
Forward Printable StoryPrint Comment



MRI Homepage

Canon studies AI-based MR technology with international academic partners Deep Learning Reconstruction may provide 7T quality on 3T systems

Staff training to calm patients yields lower MR operating costs: study Free-standing imaging facilities saved $12,800 over 1,000 exams

MR and CT singled out as drivers of U.S. health care spending JAMA study finds scans are more expensive, abundant in U.S. than other high-income countries

CereMetrix Silver neuroimaging analytics platform scores FDA approval Quantifies brain function down to the voxel level

New study highlights gender disparity in radiology Fewer female radiologists are publishing research

World's first 10.5-Tesla human MR scan performed at University of Minnesota A 110-ton magnet with a world of potential

New brain MR technique improves brain imaging for restless children Fewer motion and pulsation artifacts

Availity announces debut of pre-clearance service at HIMSS Confirms imaging authorization in minutes and ensures patient payments prior to visit

Lisa Hazen ARRT appoints new Nuclear Medicine Technology (NMT) Relationship Manager

Radiology firm sues MR service provider for more than $68,000 in unpaid services Alleges breach of contract for failure to pay for services rendered

Could also test new
anti-scarring treatments

Study finds MR can measure kidney scarring and predict future kidney function

by Lauren Dubinsky , Senior Reporter
Researchers at St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto recently made the discovery that MR imaging can be used to measure kidney damage and predict the organ’s future function.

In a study published in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, the team used an MR test called an elastogram to measure kidney scarring in 17 individuals who underwent kidney transplants.

Story Continues Below Advertisement

The (#1 Resource) for Medical Imaging and Peripherals. Call 1-949-273-8000

As a Master Distributor for major brands Barco, Philips, and Sony, we offer custom imaging solutions. With our renowned OEM Solutions and Service/Repair Center, Ampronix is a one-stop shop for HD Medical LCD Displays--Printers--Recorders--4K Cameras

“We think that our MR test would be a useful add-on test because it estimates scarring severity in the entire kidney, rather in the very small piece of the kidney that is sampled by the biopsy,” Dr. Darren Yuen, a transplant nephrologist and scientist at St. Michael’s, told HCB News.

Needle biopsies are the current standard for evaluating kidney scarring, but the patient is required to take pain medication and take a day off from work and the procedure can also result in bleeding. The MR elastogram test can do that without having to go inside the body.

It maps the stiffness of kidney tissue in order to determine if scarring is present. Diabetes, high blood pressure, and kidney transplant rejection cause scarring, which is irreversible and can eventually lead to kidney failure.

The study found that the MR elastogram test yielded comparable results to a kidney biopsy, and was also able to detect the amount and location of the scarring throughout the entire organ. It also found that kidney stiffness predicted how well the kidney would function a year after the MR exam.

The test to measure stiffness relies on generating motion in the kidney and assessing the reaction of the tissue. Currently, that can only be done in a repeatable numerical and accurate way with MR and ultrasound.

“MR has shown superiority over ultrasound in accuracy of the test in measuring scarring in other organs besides the kidney, especially the liver, so we thought it would be better to use MRI for kidneys,” said Dr. Anish Kirpalani, the study’s lead author and radiologist and scientist at St. Michael’s.

MR would not replace biopsies, but it could be used as a supplemental test to provide a more comprehensive understanding of a patient’s kidney function, according to Yuen. With the MR test, physicians can gather information on patients whose risk of biopsy is too high to undergo the procedure.

The test can also be used to test new anti-scarring treatments. There are currently no anti-scarring drugs on the market because it’s difficult to rationalize performing multiple kidney biopsies for a pharmaceutical trial.

Back to HCB News
  Pages: 1

MRI Homepage

You Must Be Logged In To Post A Comment

Increase Your
Brand Awareness
Auctions + Private Sales
Get The
Best Price
Buy Equipment/Parts
Find The
Lowest Price
Daily News
Read The
Latest News
Browse All
DOTmed Users
Ethics on DOTmed
View Our
Ethics Program
Gold Parts Vendor Program
Receive PH
Gold Service Dealer Program
Receive RFP/PS
Healthcare Providers
See all
HCP Tools
A Job
Parts Hunter +EasyPay
Get Parts
Recently Certified
View Recently
Certified Users
Recently Rated
View Recently
Certified Users
Rental Central
Rent Equipment
For Less
Sell Equipment/Parts
Get The
Most Money
Service Technicians Forum
Find Help
And Advice
Simple RFP
Get Equipment
Virtual Trade Show
Find Service
For Equipment
Access and use of this site is subject to the terms and conditions of our LEGAL NOTICE & PRIVACY NOTICE
Property of and Proprietary to, Inc. Copyright ©2001-2018, Inc.