MaxQ AI rolling out machine learning application for intercranial hemorrhage

MaxQ AI rolling out machine learning application for intercranial hemorrhage

by Lisa Chamoff, Contributing Reporter | November 27, 2018
Artificial Intelligence CT X-Ray
MaxQ Artificial Intelligence showed off its recently FDA-cleared artificial intelligence (AI) application for intercranial hemorrhage (ICH) detection at the 2018 RSNA annual meeting, which the company hopes will eventually be part of a three-pronged platform designed to improve care of stroke patients and lower costs.

Accipio Ix flags non-contrast head CT scans with potential hemorrhages to ensure those cases are prioritized.

The application is integrated into the PACS system, said Gene Saragnese, chairman and chief executive officer of MaxQ AI.

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MaxQ AI has partnered with GE Healthcare to make Accipio Ix part of its subscription program, as well as with IBM, which adds the application to its PACS.

“In all cases there’s no workstation, there’s no buttons, there’s no clicks,” Saragnese told HCB News during a meeting in the company’s booth, located in the Machine Learning Showcase area of the show floor. “A physician doesn’t have to go anywhere else to find the answers.”

The company is planning to next year seek 510(k) for Accipio Ax, which will pinpoint areas of interest on the CT scan and is seeking premarket approval for the Accipio Dx, an AI application designed to rule out, or not rule out, ICH.

“We will be providing diagnostic level rule-out that’s on par with a clinical expert,” Saragnese said.

The company has received an accelerated pathway through the FDA’s Breakthrough Devices Program, and Saragnese said MaxQ AI is the first in its class of AI software to receive that designation.

Saragnese noted that stroke patients in the ED have a 9 to 30 percent misdiagnosis rate, and said if every hospital could treat one stroke patient earlier and prevent long term care, that could result in $2 billion in savings.

“There are a lot of people who aren’t being treated,” Saragnese said.

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